Clare Boothe Luce Participated in Playwriting and Politics

Clare Boothe Luce was an influential woman in politics and playwriting. Luce had three different plays adapted to motion pictures and was an advocate for participation in politics.

Image Courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration

Clare Boothe Luce was an influential woman in politics and playwriting. Luce had three different plays adapted to motion pictures and was an advocate for participation in politics.

Emma Thurgood, Reporter

“Courage is the ladder on which all the other virtues mount,” Clare Boothe Luce once said.

And as a journalist, politician, playwright and mother, Clare Boothe Luce proved that she had the utmost courage.

According to Britannica’s website, Clare Boothe Luce was born Ann Clare Boothe on March 10, 1909, in New York and raised primarily by her mother. Luce went to a private school in New York and would later go on to work for “Vogue” and “Vanity Fair” from 1930-34 as a journalist. She met and married George Brokaw when she was 20, and their marriage ended six years later. She left the relationship with a large settlement and one child. In 1935 she married Henry R. Luce, who worked as a publisher for “TIME” and “Life” magazines.

Clare Boothe Luce wrote multiple plays, and her first hit was a satirical, all-woman-cast play called “The Women.” She later wrote the plays “Kiss the Boys Goodbye” and “Margin for Error” with all three being adpated to motion pictures, Amy Shearn reported on JSTOR Daily.

Later, in 1942, she was elected to the House of Representatives and became influential in Republican politics, for the time. After the death of her 19-year-old daughter in 1944, she met Reverend Fulton J. Sheen, and converted to Roman Catholicism. This might’ve lent a hand to her future career of being an American ambassador to Italy.

According to Britannica’s website, Boothe Luce additionally served on the President’s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board under presidents Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford, and Ronald Reagan in the 1970s and 1980s. Then in 1983, she received the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

To this day, her life has had an impact on the world, especially with the Clare Boothe Luce Center for Conservative Women, which prepares and promotes conservative women to take an active role in politics.

Clare Boothe Luce lived for 84 years and proved herself to be a true renaissance woman and left her mark on American politics and culture. She succeeded in her life, not in spite of being a woman, but because she was a woman.

“Because I am a woman, I must make unusual efforts to succeed. If I fail, no one will say, ‘She doesn’t have what it takes’; They will say, ‘Women don’t have what it takes,” Boothe Luce said according to Connect History’s website.