Sobrero Saves the Day

Terry+Sobero+is+currently+helping+Valley+by+filling+in+as+an+administrator.+She+had+not+planned+to+stay+in+Vegas%2C+but+after+meeting+her+husband%2C+she+quickly+found+a+home+there.

Courtesy of Terry Sobero

Terry Sobero is currently helping Valley by filling in as an administrator. She had not planned to stay in Vegas, but after meeting her husband, she quickly found a home there.

Amy Vasquez-Rivera, Reporter

Helping Valley fill administrative positions as full-time administrators are promoted or leave, Terry Sobrero is a valuable asset.

“I was only going to stay two years in Las Vegas as I wanted to work in DOD (Department of Defense) schools, since I had attended them as a student. I ended up meeting my husband, who was also a teacher, and I stayed in Vegas,” said administrative substitute Terry Sobrero.

She had been a teacher since 1978 and later became a dean in 1995. In 2001 she became a principal then retired in 2012 and started working back in schools as an administrator substitute since 2013.

“I originally went to college to become an artist, maybe even an art teacher, but got a job working with handicapped adults and decided to change my major to be a teacher for special needs students,” Sobrero said.

Sobrero went to Northern Arizona University for her Bachelor of Science in education. She earned her Masters degree in Curriculum from Lesley College, and she received an administrative endorsement from UNLV.

Sobrero has been at Valley for the last four years after teaching and subbing as an administrator in many schools across Las Vegas, but she still faces many challenges.

“A challenge I have is being told ‘No’ when you have a great solution and have to find different avenues to implement it,” said Sobrero. “But then the rewards of accomplishing it are even greater.”

Sobrero’s favorite part of being an administrator is getting to work with students and their families as well as teachers and the community to improve the education of all students.

“I was pushed towards it [administrative position] by a formal principal,” Sobrero said. “I could help more kids, and that appealed to me; I’m glad I did it.”