Corpuz Confidently Carves a Bright Future

Senior%2C+Editor-in-Chief%2C+Valley+Viking+Scholars+President%2C+Table+Top+Club+Officer%2C+and+AP+student+Kahleia+Corpuz+holding+a+hammer+and+wearing+a+Viking+hat.+The+active+student+has+contributed+time+and+effort+into+her+studies%2C+and+has+made+Valley+a+better+place+through+her+work.

Senior, Editor-in-Chief, Valley Viking Scholars President, Table Top Club Officer, and AP student Kahleia Corpuz holding a hammer and wearing a Viking hat. The active student has contributed time and effort into her studies, and has made Valley a better place through her work.

Quinn Pedrick, Managing Editor

Senior Kahleia Corpuz devotes her time and energy to making Valley a better educational institution while also working to achieve her own personal goals.

Corpuz came to Valley in the Hospitality and Tourism program as a sophomore, which led to her later taking a job at the Discovery Children’s Museum. She promptly joined Valley Viking Scholars as a founding member, leading to currently being the President. She is also the Editor-in-Chief of “Thor’s Hammer,” Valley’s source of news, and an officer of Table Top Club, where she indulges in her creative side in games of Dungeons and Dragons.

“Running the paper and leading Scholars has given me a position where I can nurture my leadership skills and collaborate with individuals and build teamwork skills,” Corpuz said. “This has led to me being more of a team player. It has also allowed me to find like-minded people and find my own self.”

Corpuz, the history buff, plans to attend the University of Nevada, Las Vegas to earn a Bachelor’s degree in History and a Master’s degree in Secondary Education in hopes of becoming a high school history teacher in her home state of Nevada. She aspires to be able to give back to her community in remembrance of her own teachers while also indulging in what she finds to be a fascinating subject.

“I work with kids at the museum, and I found I really enjoy seeing the little spark in their eye when they get it and understand what you’re teaching them,” Corpuz said. “Teachers did a lot for me and I want to be able to give back to the community and be there for students the way my teachers were for me.”

One of Corpuz’s past teachers, Joshua Harris, who taught her for AP Human Geography has supported her journey for years, encouraging her occupational motives and helping to supply her historical arsenal of knowledge.

“I knew from the very beginning, the first month of school, that Kahleia is one of those students who is so self sufficient and focused, that as a teacher if you’re doing anything, you are holding her back from her true potential,” Harris said. “She is able to succeed no matter what a teacher does in the classroom even if they screw it up.”

Corpuz claims that she has had multiple supportive social studies teachers that she can’t help but associate with the subject. Her love for memorization and analyzation makes digging into the facts for interpretation fascinating.

“History provides a lot more than any other subject,” Corpuz said. “You’re given a set timeline and you can see essentially how those timelines work together as well as how they may or may not have led to certain things, which is a really cool aspect of history. I’m also a really big fan of the concept of learning from our past and understanding our past mistakes because the first step to understanding how we can move forward in the future is to identify the mistakes and hold ourselves accountable for fixing them.”

Corpuz has also been a part of Valley’s AOHT in which she learns life skills she believes are applicable to most aspects of life like learning better social skills when it comes to most importantly employers. She applies the skills she learned in the program to her life as a graduating senior now, and will continue to take those lessons with her when she officially enters the adult world soon.

“[My greatest accomplishment has been] maintaining a 4.0, being at a good standing at my job, and being involved in multiple leadership roles all at the same time,” Corpuz said. “I’ve had a lot of people say they look up to me and that they strive to do better because of me, and I think that’s definitely something that makes me feel happy; that I can be a motivation for other people and I want to do it for them.”

Apart from uplifting words of encouragement to her younger self, Corpuz stated that she would tell her freshman self that everything happens for a reason. Young Corpuz was rejected and waitlisted by multiple high schools left to attend her zoned school, but she realizes now that the schools did not deserve her attendance. She found Valley was the school that would bring her the best result academically and mentally.

“Valley gave me a place when I really needed it the most,” Corpuz said. “Freshman year [at another high school], I was not in a school that served me mentally or emotionally. Valley provided an escape from that situation. It allowed me to build self confidence and self motivation and self worth. I met so many people who showed me what true friendship was and I met amazing teachers who provided guidance and support even through my toughest moments.”