Mims Makes Memories Teaching In-Person

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Kaylani Rodrigues

Social studies teacher Darby Mims spends her first year back in the physical classroom at Valley. Mims also joined Valley Vikings Scholars as an adviser.

Kaylani Rodrigues, Managing Editor

Twelfth grade government teacher, Darby Mims, experiences her first year at Valley.

Before coming to Valley, Mims went to college as an education major at UNLV after she graduated from Sierra Vista High School.

“I teach 12th grade government and 12th grade government honors,” Mims said. “I [also] teach junior studies. This is my first year teaching all of those courses, but I’ve been teaching Social Studies for five years now.”

Mims initially wanted to go into politics and law to become the first female president, but while in high school she realized teaching was where her heart was. She also became an adviser for Valley Vikings Scholars.

“I became a teacher because I moved around a lot while I was growing up and I just was lucky enough to have awesome teachers wherever I went and school was just the place that I loved to be,” Mims said. “In a way, [I went into law and politics] since I teach government now but I just came to the realization… that if I could be like the teachers that I had had, just even for one student, it would be worth it to be a teacher, and so far I really enjoy it and I’ve met a lot of great kids.”

When she isn’t teaching or at school, Mims spends her spare time in the park or reading as well as doing mindfulness practices.

“I try to do yoga everyday, and I’m very into astrology as a lot of my students would know, so if you guys ever need your birth chart read, you can come to me,” Mims said. “Also reality TV is my guilty pleasure.”

After experiencing what it was like to teach students from a computer screen, Mims is ecstatic to be back on campus.

“I am very happy to be back and around students again and just have interactions because online [learning] was tough for teachers, too,” Mims said. “Online I personally didn’t really have that. Most of my kids just kept their screens off and their volume off so there wasn’t too much interaction. I’m hoping that maybe we can readjust the way that we do school in this post-pandemic world where it’s just more meaningful and focused on self care for students and teachers as well.”